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Models of madness – why does the media still frame mental health in medical terms?

I think that experiences like depression and anxiety get called “illnesses” as a way of signalling the vast difference between someone when they feel mentally “well”, compared to when they don’t. Indeed, most of the diagnostic criteria for mental “illnesses” include the fact that the symptoms either cause significant distress to a person, or significant impairment in their day-to-day functioning.

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Depression and anxiety — illness not weakness. Or something else?

World Mental Health Day and New Zealand Mental Health Awareness Week both fall in October, so we’ve nominated this month as ‘mental health’ month on DPSN. We’ve asked our bloggers to let us know what they think on the issue of mental health, be it personal experiences, social and cultural attitudes and awareness, stories of supporting others, or the perspectives of those who work in the field. As always, we’re keen for you to be part of the conversation, so let us know your thoughts in the comments below, or jump over to our Facebook page to join the conversation.

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Let’s have some new gender stories please

When I was a kid, there were girls and boys, men and women. My sister was a bit of a tomboy (hardly surprising perhaps, given she had two older brothers). Truth be known, I was a bit of bit of a sissy (not as acceptable as my sister’s gender-non-stereotypical behaviour) but, apart from ‘big boys don’t cry’, I was never particularly shamed on account of it.

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My Body

I strut around my world forgetting how I appear to others when I walk. Then I’ll catch a glimpse of my reflection and be reminded of the iconic ‘Anna waddle’. But I tend to just shrug it off and carry on.

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DPSN Vlog: Bodies

For our Video Blog this month, we have interviewed researcher George Parker about their studies of fatphobia in healthcare, and the importance of centring compassion, justice and care: