The power of labels — is it time to move on?

A while ago I posted a meme, which said, “Better to have lost in love than to live with a psycho for the rest of your life.”

I liked it of course, otherwise I wouldn’t have posted it. Eleven others did too, some commenting on Facebook, “Amen to that,” and “Definitely!!”

Then this: “Hate it. It’s beat up on people with mental illness time again. Ever had the amazing person you love tell you that they just can’t deal with your mental illness anymore? Our society is totally phobic about people with mental illness having intimate relationships.”

DPSN Vlog: Language

This week’s vlog is about AAC, as part of DPSN’s Language theme for the month. We chat with Gabby who talks about the importance of AAC, and what it means for her. Apologies for the poor sound quality, I had a bit of trouble with it when recording. You can read more from Gabby at…

“Mind your language!”

“Mind your language!”

That was what parents used to tell their kids to warn them not to swear. In the last 20 or 30 years however, some people in the disabled community seem to have taken that saying even more seriously than ever before.

“Disabled”, “handicapped”, “special needs”, “differently abled”, ” handicapable”. All these words and phrases have been used over the years to describe those of us whose physical abilities differ from most people’s. Then there’s the very long-winded “people first” language, as in “person with a disability” or “person with special needs” and so on.

Millennials – the lazy generation or victims of circumstance?

There’s an interesting trend that’s been going on for a while now in the media, in regards to the language that’s used to describe a group of people called millennials.

When I went looking for who exactly counts as a millennial I found that there are no precise dates that define them. Wikipedia says, “researchers typically use the early 1980s as starting birth years and the mid-1990s to early 2000s as ending birth years…generally the children of baby boomers.”

So, youngish people who range from their late teens to their mid 30s. I guess that makes me one (being a child of the mid-80s myself).

Freedom, security and the space in between

Nearly 20 years ago, when I was 30 (he says, suddenly realising his age), I read millionnaire and “Rich Dad, Poor Dad” guru Robert Kiyosaki’s second book, The Cashflow Quadrant. It changed my life in many ways, including increasing what Kiyosaki terms my Financial IQ. But most of all it began me thinking about the spectrum of freedom and security.

DPSN Vlog: Space

This month’s DPSN theme is Space, and who better to talk about space than Dr. JJ Eldridge – Astrophysicist and Non-binary person studying exploding binary stars in NZ.

They chat with us about exploding binary start, and exploding the myth of the gender binary. They explore how science, and the study of space, can create more space for gender and sex diversity and fluidity.