Five decades down

Philip Patston shares a post about beginning his 50s, reflecting on how he has lived, and his plans for the future. This blog was written on December 26th, 2017.  

In my 20s I didn’t think I would still be alive at 30. I had that punk thing going on and I honestly thought I would do something stupid and kill myself. So when I did make to 30 I was actually quite impressed with myself!

At that time I did some visioning for the future. I started thinking about how I wanted my life to be at 50. I opened a superannuation fund that would mature when I was 50, potentially giving myself the option to stop working. I decided I wanted to be financially free rather than secure, which would mean I would need to work hard to build a sustainable business. I wanted to be doing work I loved with people I loved. And I wanted to be living somewhere that was beautiful, safe and comfortable, and that I had control of.

 

So, yesterday I turned 50 and, over the past year, I’ve been realising I’ve achieved my vision. I’m exactly where I wanted to be 20 years ago. I have enough money that I don’t have to worry about bills or tax etc (by no means am I rich but I have enough to live my chosen lifestyle). The work I do is meaningful and fun and I have great relationships with my colleagues and clients – most I call friends.

 

My living and working space is beautiful and safe, despite a couple of years of bad neighbours. And I live alone so I have the control over my environment that I wanted.

I am both grateful and proud.

 

So now I have achieved what I envisioned for myself 20 years ago, it’s time to envision the next 20 years – how do I want to be when I’m 70?

When I began reading about future visualisation, I learned that it’s most effective when you aren’t too specific. So, for example, I visualised feeling financially free, rather than seeing $1m in my bank account. Because being financially free doesn’t mean having a certain amount of money in the bank – it’s about how you feel about money. Similarly, I didn’t envision a certain house that I’d be living in – I just thought about qualities it would have.

In the next 20 years I am surrounded and connected to more people (note I’m using the present tense – if I think “will” or “want” I will create a future of wanting things or things always being in the future. So I use the present tense in order to manifest a desirable “future now”).

 

So by the time I’m 70 I’m living with likeminded people in some way that is both collective and individual – I have my own space as well as being part of a supportive community. I have a lover or lovers who are independent and committed. My work is based where I live where I create experiences that bring people together to get to know each other and themselves better. My work is chosen not imposed and I still work with people I love, doing what I love.

 

My support needs are met effortlessly and seamlessly – I never have to worry about getting my needs met.

 

We live sustainably with as small an environmental footprint as we can, but we are not evangelical – we just know that looking after ourselves, each other and the environment go hand in hand.

 

Perhaps we have a microeconomy of some kind but, however we exchange goods and services, it’s ethical, equal and respectful.

 

We live happily, enthusiastically and unapologetically. Pragmatically spiritual, we embrace our connections to the land, the universe and all of life.

 

This is my future now. So be it.

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