Cultivating a different attitude

Early last year I talked about my newly developed anxiety around flying.  In an effort to help me manage the problem better, later in the year I attended a “Flying without fear” course held out at Auckland Airport.  Today I thought I’d share a few of the things that I learned in the hopes that it might help other people with a fear of flying.

The course contained a lot of information – some of it I already knew, some I knew about but had forgotten, and some was entirely new (and very helpful).

DPSN Team Favourites: Vlog – Change (Anna)

We interviewed Julie Watson to talk to us about the change people go through when entering aged-care facilities, and how she works to change the sector to make it more friendly to the Rainbow Community with Silver Rainbow

DPSN Team Favourites: A Quick word on Aging (Barbara’s Favourite)

My birthday’s coming up soon. Looking in the mirror, I seem to notice a new wrinkle on my face almost every day, lately, although that might be just the thought of getting another year older making my imagination work overtime!

It’s strange how when we’re young, some of us can’t wait to be grown up. But when we become adults, people often talk about birthdays as if they are something to be afraid of. I heard someone the other day say, “I’ll be ‘the big 3-0’ soon!”, with a frightened look on her face. It made me take notice of her words, because when this birthday has passed, I’ll be ‘the big a-lot-more-than-that’.

Birthdays measure time passing; and with time, people get older. It’s just the way it is. But are those changes we go through as we age something to be frightened of?

Embracing the balance

Yesterday I was reminded yet again how much pressure is put on people to expect to feel ‘up’ all the time and that, if they feel ‘down’ for some reason, there’s something wrong with them.

Someone I was talking to had had it suggested to them they see a doctor because they weren’t feeling too good. Of course a doctor would have probably prescribed anti-depressants to “even out’ their mood.

An interesting time

I recently read three very different takes on the world as it is now and how it compares to the past. One was this article in the Guardian, “The age of anger”, another Margaret Wheatley’s new book, “Who Do We Choose To Be?: Facing Reality, Claiming Leadership, Restoring Sanity” and the third, a book by Magenta Pixie, “Masters of the Matrix: Becoming the Architect of Your Reality and Activating the Original Human Template”.

Death

Now that I have your attention…death can be a very depressing subject. But in the English language, there are many sayings involving death. When we laugh really hard, we say we have “died laughing”. When a performer live on stage feels a bad “vibe” from their audience, they may say they “died on stage” (although I’m sure this has never happened to any of the performers I know!)

Most people I know think of death as the end of everything, but many religions consider death to be only the beginning of another stage of life.

At 52, I am probably more than halfway on the journey to my own death, unless some clever scientist invents a way to live forever, or at least for more than 104 years.

Fringe leadership – what are the alternatives?

When it comes to leading change and creating social movements, particularly when it involves people on the margins of society, it’s easy to fall into the trap of assuming success means “widening” the mainstream to accept a new group of previously excluded citizens.

Reverence may be paid to new rituals and customs. Changes may be made to environments to make them more accessible or representative. Language may be scrutinised and modified to create a more welcoming lexicon. Laws may change to increase rights and entitlements.

In themselves these acknowledgements are important and meaningful. They achieve their intent – to decrease exclusion and increase participation.