Who means a lot to you?

Over the last few months Philip, Anna, Barbara and I have been collecting stories for DPSN’s  “You Mean A Lot To Me” project. Our goal is to get 100 or more people to talk on camera about someone who means a lot to them.  We’re planning on blogging one video a day as part of…

UMAL2M__How_to_contribute — email, usb, dropbox

UMAL2M: How to contribute!

Want to contribute to UMAL2M? It’s easy! Grab a camera, a computer, or a phone and film yourself talking about someone who means a lot to you. Or, if you’re feeling really brave, film yourself telling it to that person! There are two guidelines: The person has to be alive, because we’d love it if you…

The language of suffering

The Mental Health Foundation has a “language primer” on their website, which makes suggestions for ways in which journalists can report on mental illness without using discriminatory language or reinforcing stereotypes. The document rightly points out that language both reflects and shapes social reality.  Language can be a powerful way to stigmatise, or equalise, different…

Recovery in mental health

Some of the projects Diversityworks Trust is involved in are based around issues of mental health.  During one discussion on the topic, we came around to the idea of recovery. One person was arguing that we shouldn’t use the word “recovery” in relation to mental health.  The argument was that recovery suggests there is some…