Death

Now that I have your attention…death can be a very depressing subject. But in the English language, there are many sayings involving death. When we laugh really hard, we say we have “died laughing”. When a performer live on stage feels a bad “vibe” from their audience, they may say they “died on stage” (although I’m sure this has never happened to any of the performers I know!)

Most people I know think of death as the end of everything, but many religions consider death to be only the beginning of another stage of life.

At 52, I am probably more than halfway on the journey to my own death, unless some clever scientist invents a way to live forever, or at least for more than 104 years.

The power of labels — is it time to move on?

A while ago I posted a meme, which said, “Better to have lost in love than to live with a psycho for the rest of your life.”

I liked it of course, otherwise I wouldn’t have posted it. Eleven others did too, some commenting on Facebook, “Amen to that,” and “Definitely!!”

Then this: “Hate it. It’s beat up on people with mental illness time again. Ever had the amazing person you love tell you that they just can’t deal with your mental illness anymore? Our society is totally phobic about people with mental illness having intimate relationships.”

DPSN Vlog: Language

This week’s vlog is about AAC, as part of DPSN’s Language theme for the month. We chat with Gabby who talks about the importance of AAC, and what it means for her. Apologies for the poor sound quality, I had a bit of trouble with it when recording. You can read more from Gabby at…

“Mind your language!”

“Mind your language!”

That was what parents used to tell their kids to warn them not to swear. In the last 20 or 30 years however, some people in the disabled community seem to have taken that saying even more seriously than ever before.

“Disabled”, “handicapped”, “special needs”, “differently abled”, ” handicapable”. All these words and phrases have been used over the years to describe those of us whose physical abilities differ from most people’s. Then there’s the very long-winded “people first” language, as in “person with a disability” or “person with special needs” and so on.

Diversity Dilemma: Sexuality

Philip Patston shares the final part in his series on the diversity dilemmas that New Zealanders face in 2015. Growing awareness of diverse sexuality in the workplace is one thing. But here’s the dilemma: What if the dominant culture of the organisation is to talk about the ideals of heteronormative marriage and children, mums and dads, with…

NZSL Rainbow Vocabulary VLOG

This is a video blog about some of the LGBTIA/Rainbow NZSL signs. I’m no expert, so sorry if there are some mistakes in here (please let me know if there are and I’ll fix them!) – and if you know of any other NZSL ones, let me know too! Check out these videos for ASL…

Your language bites

Language is a fundamental part of being human. Whether it is spoken, written or sign language,  its purpose is to convey or communicate a message as well as express culture. There is a large amount of slang, street language and text language creeping into everyday communication, including sign language. Within communities there is also a…