The times they are a-changin’

As we continue to roll into 2017, we’ve decided to make March ‘change’ month on DPSN. We’ve asked our bloggers to let us know their thoughts on change – be it positive or negative experiences, how people cope with change in themselves or others, or how the world is changing around us. As always, we’re keen for you to be part of the conversation, so let us know your thoughts on change in the comments below, or jump over to our Facebook page to join the conversation.

DPSN Team Favourites: The language of suffering (Sam)

The Language of Suffering was such an interesting blog post – I came across it before I started working for DPSN and I was working in the mental health sector. It stirred enough in me that I decided to comment (something I rarely do! ha!), and it’s still something I’m getting my head around – how do we talk about the hard stuff of mental illness, as well as balancing it with the positives that our unique brains bring us? What I took away from this post was that giving blanket rules about how to talk about Mental Illness isn’t helpful, because all our experiences, and ways of talking about it are – as always – diverse! – Sam

DPSN Team Favourites: Depression – a common problem with a unique resolution (Barbara)

Hello and happy new year! DPSN is back online and we thought we’d kick off February with a few of our favourite blogs of all time. I start with a little blog I wrote back in June last year as part of our ‘common and unique month’. Why is it my favourite? I don’t write much about my personal experience of depression any more. As someone who now works in mental health, my focus is more often on therapy, recovery and the mental health industry as a whole. But in reality, going through my own struggle is at the heart of why I ended up working where I am. As we move into a new year it feels good remind myself why I do the work that I do; and how incredibly grateful I am to be able to do it.

Self-compassion and self-care: being as kind to yourself as you are to other people

We thought we’d lead on from the mental health theme by making November ‘self-care’ month on DPSN. We’ve asked our bloggers to talk about the stress of modern life and what they do to take care of their physical, emotional and mental well-being. From what they are doing when things go right, to how things change when things go wrong! As always, we’re keen for you to be part of the conversation, so let us know your thoughts in the comments below, or jump over to our Facebook page to join the conversation.

Models of madness – why does the media still frame mental health in medical terms?

I think that experiences like depression and anxiety get called “illnesses” as a way of signalling the vast difference between someone when they feel mentally “well”, compared to when they don’t. Indeed, most of the diagnostic criteria for mental “illnesses” include the fact that the symptoms either cause significant distress to a person, or significant impairment in their day-to-day functioning.